Many individuals in Georgia understandably want to get parole as soon as possible. Parole allows them to be released from prison before their official sentence is completed. This may allow them to spend time with family, obtain meaningful employment, and enjoy relative freedom. However, parole is only granted to individuals who fulfill a number of requirements. These terms of probation are quite varied; they include things like paying your child support on time, not committing any more crimes, and not leaving the state. Another notable condition of parole involves education.

You may want to consider hiring a qualified parole attorney if you are dealing with the parole process in Georgia. A parole attorney, or lawyer, can provide the best possible representation and increase your chances of being granted parole. Jana Harris Law will guide you through the entire process, including all of the requirements.

What Does Georgia Law Say About Parole Eligibility and GEDs?

An inmate is allowed to pursue a GED while incarcerated at no cost. {Although it is required that all inmates are employed during their incarceration, obtaining an education does not affect your wage.}

The Southern Center for Human Rights offers the following explanation of how parole eligibility works in relation to GEDs:

“A person serving time for a nonviolent crime who has a GED may be eligible for release on parole after serving 1/3 of his sentence – as long as he or she has not been convicted of any prison infractions during that time. A person serving time for a violent crime who has a GED may be eligible for release on parole after serving 1/2 of his sentence – as long as he or she has not been convicted of any prison infractions during that time.”

Please note: The up-to-date GED Testing Fee was raised to $145 in January 2013 and is subject to change Click Here   Click Here for the US Department of Education where the policy is written.

The Georgia Department of Corrections does not pay for GED testing fees to the Georgia Department of Education. Inmates must pay this fee directly to Georgia Department of Education. {Inmates should have been provided with information regarding how/where to do so.}

Inmates interested in pursuing a GED should go through their counselors and ensure that they are taking the appropriate steps.

Ref: Ga. Code Ann., Corrections, 42-8-60 (a) (1)(D) – Eligibility for parole; exception; sentence computation

What if I Have a Learning Disability?

Even if you have a learning problem, you must still undertake some sort of education program. Georgia does recognize obtaining a GED may be beyond the grasp of someone who is illiterate, the state still requires at least some type of education. In this case, it may be preferable to perform hands-on training for jobs.

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Jana Harris Law is committed to answering your questions about Parole Cases, Post Conviction – State & Federal, Jury Selection, Sentencing Presentations, Removal from Sexual Offender Registry, and Select Criminal Cases and law issues in all areas of the State of Georgia.

We’ll gladly discuss your case with you at your convenience. Contact us today to schedule a consultation.

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